General

  1. What is MarineCadastre.gov?
  2. Why is this project known as the “marine cadastre”?
  3. How is MarineCadastre.gov integrating with regional ocean planning efforts?
  4. Are there plans to integrate with Data.gov/ocean?
  5. How is MarineCadastre.gov related to agency and national geoplatforms?
  6. How can I stay apprised of MarineCadastre.gov data and content updates?

Maps and Viewers

  1. Why can’t I find all of the data in the data registry within the National Viewer?
  2. What is included in the National Viewer?
  3. What is included in the regional maps?
  4. What is included in the thematic maps?
  5. What are story maps?
  6. What technologies were used to develop the National Viewer?

Data

  1. How does the project team decide which data to include?
  2. What is meant by Authoritative or Trusted source?
  3. What data formats are used in MarineCadastre.gov data?
  4. Am I able to incorporate MarineCadastre.gov data directly into my desktop GIS?
  5. How are data managed within MarineCadastre.gov?
  6. Does MarineCadastre.gov include data for the Great Lakes?
  7. What technologies were used to develop the data registry?
  8. Why is there limited data coverage in Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. Pacific Island territories?
  9. How do I formally cite MarineCadastre.gov data?

Web services

  1. Are the MarineCadastre.gov web map services available for public use?
  2. What types of web map services are available through MarineCadastre.gov?
  3. What types of applications can incorporate MarineCadastre.gov web map services?
  4. How do I add these services into ArcMap?
  5. Why does adding data to ArcGIS.com from the REST service page currently not work?

General

What is MarineCadastre.gov?
MarineCadastre.gov is a cooperative effort by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to provide authoritative ocean data, tools, and support to the offshore renewable energy and marine planning communities. The project was initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-58) – Sec. 388 – Alternative Energy-Related Uses on the Outer Continental Shelf. This act directs the U.S. Department of the Interior, in cooperation with three other federal agencies—the U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Department of Defense—to establish a mapping initiative to assist in decision-making related to alternative energy uses on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). MarineCadastre.gov implements the mapping initiative requirement. At its core, MarineCadastre.gov contains data on jurisdictional boundaries, marine infrastructure and transportation, and alternative energy, as well as physical and biological data needed to support planning, management, and conservation of submerged lands and marine spaces. The combination of marine cadastral and regionally specific data provides users with many of the data layers needed for renewable energy siting and other marine planning efforts.

Why is this project known as the “marine cadastre”?
A cadastre is a record of property and contains information at the parcel level about legal boundaries, usage, rights, and restrictions. A marine cadastre contains similar information about ocean space. Using the term “cadastre” lets the user know that the base data on this site is focused on providing a legal framework. Over time the project has evolved into a more comprehensive system to include many other types of data.

How is MarineCadastre.gov integrating with regional ocean planning efforts?
MarineCadastre.gov is recognized by regional ocean planning groups as the “go to” place for authoritative federal ocean data. Data, metadata, and services from the project are being integrated into the Northeast Ocean Data Portal, Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal, and the West Coast Ocean Data Portal. There is coordination of data and sharing of lessons learned between these ocean planning groups and the MarineCadastre.gov team through regional liaisons and working groups such as the Marine Planning Portal Network. The long-term goal is to have each authoritative data set hosted and maintained by the agency of responsibility and usable by all levels of users. The “make it once and use it many times” model guarantees that users have access to current data, and it increases efficiency among all levels of government data providers.

Are there plans to integrate with Data.gov/ocean?
Yes, this is already happening. Data.gov/ocean, a community on Data.gov, is the national marine planning information management system called for in the National Ocean Policy. Data.gov/ocean provides access to metadata for ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes data from many federal agencies. Marine Cadastre.gov’s primary focus is on providing direct access to data for renewable energy and marine planning. Most of the data sets and tools found within MarineCadastre.gov have broader applicability, and their metadata have already been made available via Data.gov/ocean to extend their discovery and use.

How is MarineCadastre.gov related to agency and national geoplatforms?
MarineCadastre.gov has featured maps on both the National Geoplatform (geoplatform.maps.arcgis.com) and the NOAA Geoplatform (noaa.maps.arcgis.com). Sharing maps via these platforms is not duplicative but complementary, extending the reach of the project’s impact.

“This kind of collaboration is a natural fit with what we are trying to do on the Geospatial Platform—to give agencies and their partners a place where they can come together and build and share data, maps, and geospatial applications,” says Jerry Johnston, Ph.D., the geospatial information officer for the U.S. Department of the Interior. “Working with MarineCadastre.gov, we have been able to bring a number of their great examples and best practices into the platform. This allows us to start to expose some really compelling content as well as to show others how they can use the platform to effectively work together using the tools we have made available.”

How can I stay apprised of MarineCadastre.gov data and content updates?
The project team posts updates and additions to the data registry, web map services, viewers, and web content on the Updates page and through Twitter and Facebook. Users can also sign up to receive email notifications for updates to web map services.


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Maps and Viewers

Why can’t I find all of the data in the data registry within the National Viewer?
The current technology of the National Viewer limits what types of web services we are able to showcase, thereby limiting the number of data sets that are found within it. Specifically, only Esri representational state transfer (REST) services are compatible; they have to be dynamic, cached, or image services (feature services are not compatible). The team recognizes these limitations and is developing requirements for a new viewer that will address this issue. In the meantime, you can access the complete listing of data available on MarineCadastre.gov via the Data Registry. Choose “add to map” to view it in an ArcGIS.com viewer.

What is included in the National Viewer?
The National Viewer is intended to be used as a planning and screening tool and contains many of the data sets you will find via the MarineCadastre.gov Data Registry. The National Viewer allows users to rearrange layers, change transparency, use an ID tool to look at attributes beneath the cursor for active layers, print, and share maps with others.

What is included in the regional maps?
The regional maps demonstrate how MarineCadastre.gov data can be used along with state or regionally applicable data sets to inform ocean planning decisions.

What is included in the thematic maps?
Thematic web maps have been developed in ArcGIS Online and include data that highlight particular data sets of interest.

What are story maps?
Story maps combine data and contextual information in a visual format to explain how ocean data can be used and why it is important.

What technologies were used to develop the National Viewer?
The Marine Cadastre National Viewer is a data-driven web application. For the back-end, the data are stored in an SQL Server database, which is built using the Open Data Protocol and provided to the application through web services. The application and ArcGIS map services are hosted on Apache web servers. The front-end of the application is built using Leaflet, AngularJS, LESS, Grunt, and several other JavaScript libraries.


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Data

How does the project team decide which data to include?
The team is always looking for feedback on what our users need. Please let us know what data would help you by emailing info@marinecadastre.gov. If you would like to contribute data, please review the requirements.

What is meant by an authoritative or trusted source?
An authoritative source is usually a federal or state government agency or a group designated by the agency to create information to meet mission requirements mandated by law or policy. For data, this means that the agency, state, or other jurisdiction is responsible for the collection or creation of information in order to meet a mandated requirement or policy. For instance, the Coast Guard is responsible for determining where official shipping traffic lanes (routing measures) should exist, and NOAA is responsible for making this data available on Navigational Charts. Because NOAA is getting the authoritative data from the Coast Guard’s descriptions in the Code of Federal Regulations, the MarineCadastre.gov references that particular data layer from NOAA Charts.

A trusted source is one that is not mandated to create information, but does so for its own reasons. This information may be the best available data meeting an information requirement not currently being fulfilled or mandated by a federal or state agency. For instance, NASCA Submarine Cables data layer is provided through an agreement with that organization and is not an authoritative source, but since that type of information is not provided by any other source, the location of the cables under that organization’s purview is known to be the best available information and is used by agencies needing this type of information.

What data formats are used in MarineCadastre.gov data?
The format of the data within MarineCadastre.gov depends on the authoritative source from which the data were derived. Many partners provide data in shapefile format. Data created by the project team are in a file geodatabase. Web services are also available for many of the layers. The data registry provides a full listing of data and available formats.

Am I able to incorporate MarineCadastre.gov data directly into my desktop GIS?
Yes. For many data sets, you can download the data from the Data Registry to integrate into your desktop system. If you would like to be sure you are continuously getting the most up-to-date data for your mapping project, the National Viewer and map gallery data are available as Esri REST services, which are updated on a cyclical basis. Connecting to these services will ensure that the data in your project will update when the services are updated. To learn how to connect to these in ArcGIS, view our tutorial. Open Geospatial Consortium-compliant web map services are also available for many of MarineCadastre.gov data sets. There is ongoing research to find web services from trusted sources that provide the most recent, authoritative data to users. Note: All MarineCadastre.gov-derived REST services are projected to the ESRI WebMercator map projection. This may cause some data placement or calculation distortions at larger scales. In order to ensure that data are in their original projection system within your map project, downloading the GIS data files from MarineCadastre.gov is the suggested method.

How are data managed within MarineCadastre.gov?
The vision of the project has been to provide access to data directly from the source through web map services. However, some agencies have yet to implement web services. The MarineCadastre.gov team has devised an interim strategy of harvesting some of the data from these agencies and publishing web services. MarineCadastre.gov will either host the data download or refer users to the authoritative source for download. The team strives to acquire data from the authoritative source and works with data providers to help reach this goal. Our aim is to enable the best possible ocean planning data to be discovered, understood, and accessed.

Does MarineCadastre.gov include data for the Great Lakes?
The waters of the Great Lakes are all state territory and therefore have not been a focus for MarineCadastre.gov, which obtains most of its data from federal sources for federal waters. However, some data sets are included that cover all Great Lakes. These include selected data on boundaries, wind resource potential, and NOAA chart-related data. MarineCadastre.gov is always looking for user feedback, so please let us know what sorts of data would help you by emailing info@marinecadastre.gov.

What technologies were used to develop the data registry?
The data registry is a data-driven web application. Similar to the structure of the National Viewer, the data are stored in an SQL Server database and provided to the application through web services. The application is hosted on Apache web servers. The front-end of the application is build using AngularJS, HTML5, and CSS.

Why is there limited data coverage in Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. Pacific Island territories?
We are working with regional offices in the Pacific Islands and Alaska to make more data sets available. MarineCadastre.gov is always looking for user feedback, so please let us know what data would help you by emailing info@marinecadastre.gov.

How do I formally cite MarineCadastre.gov data?
When citing a specific data layer please use the following format:

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). MarineCadastre.gov. {Enter Data Layer Name from Metadata}. Retrieved {Enter Month Day, Year} from marinecadastre.gov/data.


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Web Services

Are the MarineCadastre.gov web map services available for public use?
Yes, most of our data layers are served through web map services. Via the Data Registry, you can access web map services for each data layer when available.

What types of web map services are available through MarineCadastre.gov?
Currently, ArcGIS Server dynamic, tile cache, and image services are available within the National Viewer. We also have recently been adding feature services to the data registry until our National Viewer is able to accept these. These services use the REST web standard.

What types of applications can incorporate MarineCadastre.gov web map services?

  1. Lightweight applications or mashups – Any viewer using the Web Mercator Projection (ArcGIS.com, Google Maps, Bing Maps, and Flex, Javascript, or Silverlight applications)
  2. Client-side applications – Google Earth, ArcGIS Explorer, NASA Whirlwind, and others
  3. Desktop applications – Esri’s ArcMap, QGIS

How do I add these services into ArcMap?
This tutorial details step-by-step instructions for adding and using MarineCadastre.gov web map services in ArcMap.

Why does adding data to ArcGIS.com from the REST service page currently not work?
This issue began when the coast.noaa.gov domain was enabled as HTTPS. When you select open service in “ArcGIS online viewer” from the REST page, inspect the URL that opens within ArcGIS online. Notice there is not an “s” in the “http”. If you add the missing S after http, press enter, and wait a few moments, the data will begin to draw.


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